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In this 21st century, the world around us is dramatically occupied by multi-storey buildings. The number of buildings constructed per year is getting increased. As a result of this natural resources are getting exploited and polluted to a greater extent. If this status continues, then the future sustainability will be a greatest interrogation. This can be overcome by the construction of the green buildings. The green buildings are totally different from the conventional buildings. The green buildings are the buildings constructed with the energy efficient materials.

The awareness about the green buildings and the necessity of the green buildings has their wide spread all over the world. Many nations started their own organization to award the buildings, constructed as per their rating system. India also includes itself in that list. India adopts a rating system called GRIHA as the National Green Building Rating System of the country. The highlight of the GRIHA is that it also rates the non-air conditioned buildings as green buildings. The CESE building of the IIT Kanpur is the first GRIHA rated building in India.

The Indian Green building council (IGBC) awards the buildings with certified, silver, gold and platinum as per the point that they are getting. IGBC also certify the buildings with the LEED certification under the license of the USGBC. Let us see some green buildings in India with LEED certification.

CII-Sohrabji Godrej Green Business center

CII-Sohrabji Godrej Green Business center at Hyderabad inaugurated on 14th July 2004 by the then president of India H.E Shri A P J Abdul Kalam. This building earned the LEED platinum rating in 2003. This was the first building to receive the platinum certification outside US and also first in India. This building is designed in such a way to collects the rain water, relies on the natural lighting’s and make use of the solar power.These results in the conservation of energy by 55 percent, compared to the other conventional buildings.

ITC Green Center

 

ITC Green Center located at the city of Gurgaon, Haryana was opened in 2005. This building received the LEED platinum certification. This building recycles and reuses all the water that lands on it, results in zero water discharge. This building uses insulated glasses that keeps the heat out and allows the natural light to transmit into the building. This building saves the energy and water by 51 percent and 40 percent respectively. This building has saved Rs.1 crore in power cost annually. The construction of this building uses certified woods. This building uses CO2 Monitoring system to improve the quality of the air to provide the fresh air.

The Olympia Tech Park

 

The Olympia Tech Park covers 1.8-million square feet in Chennai, Tamil Nadu. This is considered as the largest green building in the world. This building was awarded with LEED Gold certification. The energy efficient glass  features of this park are low power consumption and 100 percent water recycling facility. This building allows the natural light into the building. The park has a reverse osmosis plant to process the drinking water whilst the recycled sewage water is used to service the urinals and flushing requirements within that building.

Technopolis

Technopolis, a 14-storey building in Kolkata is the India’s first IT infrastructure that earned the LEED Gold certification. It covers 4, 25, 000-sq ft area. This building was expected to reduce the carbon emission by 7,500 tones.

ABN Amro Bank N.V

 

ABN Amro Bank N.V. in Ahmadabad earned LEED platinum certification on 5th December 2007. This is the first bank in India to achieve the LEED platinum for commercial interiors and also the first platinum interiors certification outside US. It cuts the cost of energy by 34 percent and air – condition cost by 19 percent. Thus the India is marching towards an environmentally friendly future.

In recent times, nearly every corporate office building in the world has been bitten by the Green bug; energy-efficiency and sustainability are architectural buzzwords and no construction can remain untouched by these all-essential features.

This phenomenon has found its way to India as well, and the best example in recent times is the ACC headquarters in Mumbai. The country’s leading cement company received the LEED India New Construction – Gold rating award for the “Cement House” late last year. ACC received this prestigious award at a specially organized ceremony during the Annual Meet of Indian Green Building Council (IGBC) at the Chennai Trade Centre in Chennai.

Cement House is not a newly constructed building. It is a renovated building, enhanced with multiple features for sustainability and eco-friendliness. Cement House was the first project in the country to be registered under the criterion ‘major renovation of an existing building’. Cement House heralds the legitimacy of the belief that only new constructions can be part of the Green Building brigade.

The building has also received a Five Star rating for being the most energy-efficient in the category of energy-efficient office buildings. This rating has been conferred to it by the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE), Ministry of Power, Government of India.

Central Atrium

 

 

 

 

The renovation architects unlocked a central shaft in the core of the building to serve as a ready-made grand atrium around which offices on each floor are laid out. The ample use of glass imparts a sense of space by merging the outside world with the interiors. The absence of partition walls, the wide glass windows and a huge central atrium have together facilitated the penetration of natural daylight, making artificial lights redundant for the most day.

The asbestos sheet roof has been replaced by a polycarbonate sheet and the atrium has been extended to the basement level for more and more daylight to enter. The atrium is enveloped by glass railings on three sides for maximum transparency and landscaped at the basement level to maximise the green area. The central atrium is equipped with a fire-fighting system as a measure of safety.

A central service core is used to house the HVAC and air-handling units (AHUs) on all floors and run other utilities like the chiller pipes, plumbing and drainage lines, and electrical and data cables. The service core now opens out into the sky-lit atrium. The design of the entire office revolves around the concept of this atrium and allocation of spaces around it.

The existing windows (1,320 × 2,080 mm) with wooden frames have been expanded to 1,320 × 3,000 mm sizes and renovated into more sleek aluminium open-able casement windows using double glazed units (DGU).

Green Roof

Three unused terraces in the building have now been transformed into verdant green roof gardens with plush grass, cobble-stone pathways, flowers, thick foliage and even some palm trees. Native plant species have been chosen as a measure to conserve water. The bright glass windows with these adjacent green terraces offer a refreshing view to the building occupants.

Power Conservation

Optical and motion sensors control the lighting in the workspaces, based on occupancy. Similarly, a new air-conditioning system regulates the flow of cool air depending on ambient temperature and occupancy levels in different areas of the building. The use of solar water heaters together with daylight harvesting and intelligent lighting and control systems help reduce overall energy consumption by 25 per cent.

Water Conservation

Project Orchid cuts down overall water consumption of the building by 50 per cent. All sinks are fitted with sensor-based, water-efficient plumbing fixtures. A sewage treatment plant recycles used water which is then channeled for use in the terrace garden, landscaped areas and water closets. Indoor plants are selected for their low water requirements. Rainwater is harvested effectively.

Energy-efficient Materials

Materials selected for use in flooring, ceilings, furniture, wall coverings, carpets, partitions and so on have been chosen for their recycled content or recyclable properties. These are also certified by their respective manufacturers as non-toxic. Similarly, low Volatile Organic Compound (Low VOC) paints, adhesives and sealants have been used to maintain a healthy indoor environment.

Waste Management

Waste will be segregated into dry waste and wet waste; dry waste will be diverted to recycling haulers while wet waste will be further processed to generate organic compost on site.

The open office plan includes modern furniture, well equipped conference halls, meeting rooms and breakout areas on every floor. Each conference room is equipped with the best in telephone conferencing, video-conferencing and overhead projectors. The spacious new canteen with a state-of-the-art kitchen, along with a mini-gym and coffee lounges on every floor further enhance the appeal of the building.


South India is now home to an iconic “zero energy and solar powered home”, a masterpiece in Green architecture that is set to start a welcome trend in controlled energy consumption in residences.

This zero energy space project was exhibited at the Indian Green Building Congress (IGBC) 2010, held at Chennai from 6th to 9th October last year. The IGBC is Asia’s largest Green building conference. The project was also showcased at the Economic Times’ ACEtech – Mumbai as well as Delhi chapters. These are Asia’s largest construction related expos.

About 60% of this home’s energy requirements are met by the conventional sources, while solar power supplies the remaining 40%. Nevertheless, there is no compromise on performance and comfort.

The chief sponsors of this Green initiative are Aluplast Windows, Breezair, Everest Industries, Nippon Paints, Supreme Pertochem and Roca.

EVEREST FIBRE CEMENT BOARDS

The drywall construction with fibre cement boards from Everest creates a strong, light weight, water resistant and energy efficient building envelope which supports a variety of finishes. 55% of the raw materials used to prepare these boards are recycled.

BREEZAIR FRESH AIR

Air conditioning is known to be the largest consumer of energy in a building. The Breezair system works through an evaporative cooling cycle and consumes 1/10th of the energy of a conventional air conditioning device, apart from providing 100% fresh air ventilation.

PHOTO-VOLTAIC BY TEAM SUSTAIN

This energy-efficient residence sports photo-voltaic solar panels on the rooftop. An inverter and a battery storage device are used for uninterrupted power-supply.

SUPREME INSUBOARD & BEARDSELL

Insulation of the walls and the roof is a vital element of the building envelope, meant to prevent the transfer of heat in both directions. This product reduces heat ingress through the walls/roof and hence cuts down on energy consumption for air conditioning. INSBOARD offers one the highest insulation values for XPS insulation.

ALUPLAST WINDOWS

High performance double glazed units and energy-saving UPVC frames are used to reduce energy consumption as well as sound transmission. This is a German product, which saves energy by reducing infiltration and the frames are provided with thermal breaks to prevent heat ingress.

ROCA BATHROOM

Water efficient fixtures for toilets and taps reduce the fresh water consumption in the building and also help score points for the LEED rating system.

SURABHI BAMBOO

Bamboo improves the sustainability of the building as it grows rapidly and can be harvested in much shorter period compared to hardwoods. With the help of the modern production techniques bamboo is transformed into an excellent materials for flooring, furniture and other interior design works.

NIPPON PAINTS

Low-Voc Paints are used on the interiors to create healthy indoor environment and keep away toxins which could be lead to respiratory problems. Solar Reflective paints are used on the exteriors, which facilitate reflection of sunlight and reduction in solar heat gain.

Source: http://www.inspiredGreen.in

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